T-Buffer Question

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T-Buffer Question

Jon-215
The T-buffer is the Tag Buffer.  I think the card conforms to Government Smart Card Interoperability Specification.
(GSC-IS) as defined in NIST 6887.  In particular the card is a military Alt-Token.

The commands I'm sending to the card are...

Select the object.

00 A4 04 00 07 a0 00 00 00 79 02 FE.

Next I send a read buffer...

80 52 00 00 02 01 d0  Retrieve the Tag Buffer.

then

80 52 00 00 02 02 FF Retrieve FF bytes of the Value buffer.

The tag buffer has the form   Tag 1 (length 1 - 3 bytes)  Tag 2 ( length 1- 3 - bytes) ....

The value buffer is

Value 1, Value 2, Value 3, ....

The tags in the tag buffer are what I'm trying to  figure out..

Thanks.



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Re: T-Buffer Question

Martin Paljak-4
Hello,

On Thu, Jun 7, 2012 at 3:46 PM, Jon <[hidden email]> wrote:
> The T-buffer is the Tag Buffer.  I think the card conforms to Government
> Smart Card Interoperability Specification.
> (GSC-IS) as defined in NIST 6887.  In particular the card is a military
> Alt-Token.
>
Without knowing much about the US related standards, shouldn't PIV be
the current game ?

Martin
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Re: T-Buffer Question

Douglas E. Engert
In reply to this post by Jon-215


On 6/7/2012 7:46 AM, Jon wrote:
> The T-buffer is the Tag Buffer.  I think the card conforms to Government Smart Card Interoperability Specification.
> (GSC-IS) as defined in NIST 6887.  In particular the card is a military Alt-Token.

That standard predates the PIV standards, NIST 800-73-3.
What is the ATR? I might be a dual PIV/CAC card.

OpenSC can use PIV.
(Windows 7 also has a built in driver for PIV,
and if you insert your card, you can see the certificates
using the Control panel-> Internet Options->Content->Certificates)

>
> The commands I'm sending to the card are...
>
> Select the object.
>
> 00 A4 04 00 07 a0 00 00 00 79 02 FE.

This AID looks like it is a CAC card. (Appendix D1 in 6887)
and I think the above should be :
  00 A4 04 00 05 a0 00 00 00 79

Then select the file with the certificate container: 00 FE

00 A4 01 00 02 02 FE
(Not sure if this is correct.

I think you can then read the T-buffer and V-Buffers.

> Next I send a read buffer...
>
> 80 52 00 00 02 01 d0  Retrieve the Tag Buffer.

Since you did not select another file, I think you were
reading the directory as a file.

>
> then
>
> 80 52 00 00 02 02 FF Retrieve FF bytes of the Value buffer.

The T-Buffer would most likely fit in 256 bytes, but the certificates
in the V-buffer will not.
You may have to read this in chunks using the P1 P2 to give the
offset of the data


>
> The tag buffer has the form   Tag 1 (length 1 - 3 bytes)  Tag 2 ( length 1- 3 - bytes) ....
>
> The value buffer is
>
> Value 1, Value 2, Value 3, ....
>
> The tags in the tag buffer are what I'm trying to  figure out..
>
> Thanks.
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> opensc-devel mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://www.opensc-project.org/mailman/listinfo/opensc-devel

--

  Douglas E. Engert  <[hidden email]>
  Argonne National Laboratory
  9700 South Cass Avenue
  Argonne, Illinois  60439
  (630) 252-5444
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